Radionuclide Risk Categories, Security and Required Training

Radionuclide Risk Categories

  1. No Significant Risk

    1. Areas where only generally licensed materials or naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are used including small button check sources, Ni-63 electron capture detectors and compounds of uranium and thorium.

  2. Low Risk

    1. Collections of unit dosages of nuclear medicine diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals.

    2. Unit dosages of most therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine, including those containing P-32, Sr-90, Sm-153, and activities of I-131 not exceeding 100 mCi.

    3. Vials or groups of vials of typical tracers used in biomedical research labeled with radionuclides such as H-3, C-14, S-35, P-32, P-33 and I-125.

    4. Sealed Sources in activities less than 50 mCi

    5. Total activity not exceeding 100 ALIs per laboratory.

  3. Intermediate Risk

    1. Individual sealed sources or groups of sealed sources in a single location of Cs-137, Co- 60, Sr-90, Ir-192, Pu-239 and Am-241 of total activity from 50 mCi up to a maximum of 1 Ci.

    2. Activity in a single location of I-131 exceeding 100 mCi.

    3. Mo-99/Tc-99m generators

  4. Higher Risk

    1. Individual sources or groups of sources in a single location of
      Cs-137, Co-60, Sr-90, Ir-192, Pu-239, and Am-241 of total activity greater than 1 Ci.

Levels of Security and Training (Corresponding to Radionuclide Risk Categories)

  1. Level 1
    1. Security
      1. An active police and security presence on campus
      2. Laboratory entrances are locked during off-hours
    2. Training
      1. Laboratory personnel should be trained with basic knowledge of chemical, biological and radiological hazards and procedures – Lab Safety Training
  2. Level 2
    1. Security
      1. An active police and security presence on campus
      2. Laboratory entrances are locked during off-hours
      3. Radioactive material must be secured or under constant surveillance
    2. Training
      1. Laboratory personnel should be trained with basic knowledge of chemical, biological and radiological hazards and procedures – Lab Safety Training
      2. All personnel who work within the laboratory must take the On-Line Radiation Safety Course
      3. All personnel who use radioactive material are required to take the Initial In-Lab training and Annual In-Lab training
  3. Level 3
    1. Security
      1. An active police and security presence on campus
      2. Laboratory entrances are locked during off-hours
      3. Radioactive material must be secured or under constant surveillance
      4. Key access must be limited to authorized users
      5. Ancillary personnel shall not be left unattended
    2. Training
      1. Laboratory personnel should be trained with basic knowledge of chemical, biological and radiological hazards and procedures – Lab Safety Training
      2. All personnel who work within the laboratory must take the on-line Course (or equivalent for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Medicine)
      3. All personnel who use radioactive material are required to take the Initial In-Lab training and Annual In- Lab training
  4. Level 4
    1. Security
      1. An active police and security presence on campus
      2. Laboratory entrances are locked during off-hours
      3. Radioactive material must be secured or under constant surveillance Key access must be limited to authorized users
      4. Ancillary personnel must not be left unattended
      5. Licensed materials must be separately locked
      6. Access to secondary keys must be by authorized users only
    2. Training
      1. Laboratory personnel should be trained with basic knowledge of chemical, biological and radiological hazards and procedures – Lab Safety Training
      2. All personnel who work within the laboratory must take the on-line Course (or equivalent for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Medicine)
      3. All personnel who use radioactive material are required to take the Initial In-Lab training and Annual In- Lab training