Occupational Health and Safety Programs and Services

The Occupational Health and Safety group promotes health and safety procedures and assists the university in identifying, evaluating, and eliminating occupational and workplace hazards that can cause illnesses or injuries. Online and classroom training sessions are provided for compliance with established federal, state, and local regulations and with university policies.   

Please visit our staff directory for department contact information.

Art Safety

The health and safety of faculty, staff and students who work and learn in the departments relating to art is a top priority at The Ohio State University. This is achieved through many written safety programs that relate to art and other occupations and through compliance with applicable State and Federal regulations. A good way to ensure safety in the art studio or laboratory is to understand the hazards that may be encountered and how to protect from them. This information must be obtained before beginning activities. Employees and students must be familiar with proper work practices, personal protective equipment and applicable safety guidelines.

An occupation in the art field will encounter many of the same hazardous materials and operations that are found in industrial applications; these could include working with solvents, dusts, fumes, mists, dyes and a variety of physical hazards.

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Links

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Art Safety Program
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services "Keeping the Artist Safe"
Arts, Crafts and Theatre Safety Organization

Building Emergency Action Plan

The Ohio State Department of Public Safety manages the Building Emergency Action Plan (BEAP).  The BEAP was developed to assist departments in preparing for building emergencies as required by the Ohio Fire Code – 1301:7-7-04 (D) Section 404 Fire Safety & Evacuation Plans; the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard 29 CFR 1910.38 as required by the Ohio Revised Code, Chapter 4167 (Public Employees Risk Reduction Act); and by university policy (OSU Occupational Health & Safety Policy – 3.61).

The BEAP template is intended for use by departments that occupy university facilities and should be completed as a building plan, including all departments and areas of the building in the planning and implementation process.  It is expected departments will complete this plan to meet their specific needs, operations and locations.   Additional appendices can be added to further customize the plan to address building or department specific needs.

BEAPs are managed and coordinated through the Department of Public Safety, Emergency Management and Fire Prevention with the assistance of Environmental Health and Safety.  Contact Emergency Management at 614-688-2863 for additional information or assistance completing a BEAP.

Links

Ohio State Building Emergency Action Plan (BEAP) Template
Ohio State Emergency Procedures
OSHA Emergency Action Plans

Chemical Exposure Monitoring

Environmental Health and Safety provides chemical exposure monitoring services for Ohio State colleges or departments subject to OSHA requirements and/or professional accreditation requirements. Chemical monitoring procedures are consistent with OSHA/NIOSH protocols. If you have further questions, contact Kyle Winkler.

SERVICE REQUEST

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Links

OSHA Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals
NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits - Annotated Tables

Compressed Gas Safety

The purpose of this Compressed Gas Safety Program is to provide the hazards associated with compressed gases and outline the steps to ensure employees who work with or around compressed gases are not exposed to hazards; to provide procedures for common compressed gas work duties to minimize exposure in accordance with the OSHA Hazardous Materials, Compressed Gas standards (29 CFR 1910.101); Department of Transportation Hazardous Materials Regulations; and Compressed Gas Association (CGA) guidelines.

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Links

OSHA Compressed Gas Cylinders
OSHA Compressed Gas and Equipment

Confined Space

The Confined Space Program contains requirements for practices and procedures to protect employees from the hazards of entry into a confined space, adhering to the requirements set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in Section 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Standard Number 1910.146. An important component of the Confined Space Program is the requirement for entry permits, which can be obtained through EHS.

If you have questions about confined spaces, contact Steve Davidson

SERVICE REQUEST

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Download the OSU Confined Space Safety Program

Construction Safety

All employees involved with construction activities on the Ohio State campus should become familiar with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) publications 29 CFR, Part 1910: OSHA General Industry and Health Standards and 29 CFR, Part 1926: OSHA Construction Industry Standards.

All contractors performing construction activities on the Ohio State campus are required to submit a written copy of their company’s safety and health program and the site-specific safety and health plan in accordance with Facilities Operations and Development’s (FOD) Building Design Standards, Appendix V.

If you have questions about construction safety, please contact Steve Davidson at 614-292-1284 x4-9459.

View Related Documents

Links

OSHA Construction Safety Resource Manual
Ohio BWC Excavation Safety
Ohio BWC Construction Ergonomics
Ohio BWC Safety Manual for Construction
Ohio BWC Masonry Safety Handbook
OSHA Nail Gun Safety

Crane Hoist Safety

The Ohio State University Crane, Hoist and Sling Safety Program applies to all Ohio State staff members who operate and/or are responsible for cranes, hoists and slings. Moving large, heavy loads may involve the use of specialized lifting devices, such as cranes, hoists and slings. There are significant safety issues to be considered, both for the operators and for workers near them. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established regulations and guidelines for the protection of workers and facilities relating to crane, hoist and slings in 29 CFR 1910 Subpart N (Materials Handling and Storage). The Crane, Hoist and Sling Safety Program outlines departmental responsibilities and provides important safety information regarding the use of these specialized lifting devices.

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Links

OSHA Overhead and Gantry Cranes
OSHA Cranes and Derricks
OSHA Sling Safety

Drinking Water

The Ohio State University Columbus campus drinking water supply is provided as a public utility through the City of Columbus. The drinking water supply provided to campus buildings is continuously treated and tested at the treatment facility for many common contaminants. Annual reports are available for public review at City of Columbus Drinking Water.

The City of Columbus' Water Quality Assurance Laboratory (WQAL) performs water quality monitoring and treatment research to ensure Columbus drinking water meets or is better than all federally mandated Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) standards. The WQAL also provides water quality information to the water treatment plants and addresses customer complaints and inquiries regarding water quality. In a typical year, the WQAL’s EPA licensed and certified laboratory staff complete approximately 40,000 analyses relating to 29 organic, inorganic, and microbiological water quality parameters.

Environmental Health and Safety can provide pricing for drinking water testing services and collect samples, as requested, if concerns regarding water quality are present within a building or buildings. 

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Links

City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities Water Quality Assurance
EPA Drinking Water Standards

Electric Safety

Electricity is a serious workplace hazard, capable of causing both employee injury and property damage. It is the policy of Ohio State to protect all employees, students and other personnel from potential electrical hazards. This will be accomplished through compliance with the work practices described in the Electric Safety Program along with the effective application of engineering controls, administrative controls and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Ohio State seeks to put forth an organized effort to reduce the potential for injuries relating to electrical hazards.

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Links

OSHA Electrical Safety
OSHA Electrical Safety Fact Sheet
OSHA Electrical Safety in the Workplace

Elevated Work Safety

The Elevated Work Written Program is developed and maintained to provide safety related information to users of these devices and minimize injuries as a result of improper use. This program covers all Ohio State personnel, including staff and contractors utilizing equipment to perform elevated work on Ohio State property.

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Links

American Ladder Institute - Ladder Safety Information
OSHA Ladder eTool
OSHA Ladder Safety
OSHA Aerial Lifts Safety
OSHA Scaffolding Safety
Ohio BWC Fall Protection
Ladder Safety App for Smartphones
Aerial Lift Safety Resource

Elevator Safety

The preeminent safety standard for elevators (mechanical and hydraulic) has been developed by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME A17.3-2011) and has been adopted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Contractors perform all maintenance and service work on university elevators. Ohio State employees are not permitted to conduct maintenance or service. Contractors preforming maintenance or service work on any of Ohio State’s elevators are expected to know and follow all of the applications and practices contained in ASME A17.3-2011.

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Download the OSU Elevator Safety Program

 

Employee Accident Reporting

Employees who are injured on the job or become ill as the result of a workplace exposure are required to complete an Employee Accident Report (EAR) and notify his/her supervisor.

Main campus employees requiring non-emergency medical treatment as the result of a workplace injury or illness should go to University (Employee) Health Services (2nd Floor McCampbell Hall) during the hours of 7:30 am and 4:00 pm.

Employees in need of emergency care as the result of a workplace injury/illness should go to the Wexner Medical Center or University Hospital East Emergency Departments. The decision to seek emergency medical treatment should consider whether emergency services would be obtained if the injury/illness was not work-related. In other words, would you go to the Emergency Room if the same injury occurred at home?

Regional campus employees should seek treatment at the designated local health provider.
 
Blood and Body Fluid Exposures
Employees who are exposed to blood and/or body fluids (BBFE) should report them immediately to their supervisor and complete an Employee Accident Report. The accident report should include as much information as possible about the exposure including type, cause and steps that could have been taken to prevent the exposure.

Wexner Medical Center personnel should refer to the BBFE Protocol for instructions.

Main campus personnel should call Employee Health Services at 614-293-8146 for instructions.
 

Ergonomic Assessment

Ergonomics is the science of fitting the job to the worker. EHS has implemented an ergonomics program to focus on the prevention and management of work-related musculoskeletal disorders associated with repetitive job duties. By providing a better fitting work environment, an employer can expect higher productivity, less illness and injury risk, and increased job satisfaction.

SERVICE REQUEST

View Related Documents
Ergonomic Self Assessment Tool
*If you are unable to download the ergonomic self assessment tool, please see recommended settings here.

Links

OSHA Ergonomics
OSHA Computer Workstation eTool
Ohio BWC Ergonomics for Public Employees
Ohio BWC Ergonomics Resource Guides for Various Industries
Ohio BWC Material Handling and Back Safety
CDC Ergonomics

Fall Protection

Falls from elevations account for many workplace injuries each year. EHS has developed a Fall Protection Program to eliminate fall hazards from the workplace and protect workers who are required to perform work on elevated surfaces.

Workers who are required to perform work on elevated surfaces should be familiar with the Ohio State Fall Protection Program and work closely with their competent person to ensure work is done safely and meets all related standards and guidelines set forth by OSHA, ANSI and EHS.

The Ohio State Fall Protection Program outlines responsibilities for employees involved in elevated work; supervisors of employees involved in elevated work, elimination of fall hazards, and protection against fall hazards when they are present.

Work at heights greater than four feet, unprotected from a fall hazard, should be reviewed by the competent person and/or EHS to ensure proper protection.

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Download the OSU Fall Protection Safety Program

Forklift and Powered Industrial Truck Safety

Ohio State's Forklift and Powered Industrial Truck Safety Program applies to all staff members who operate and/or are responsible for powered industrial trucks.

Powered industrial trucks include forklifts, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks and other specialized industrial trucks powered by electric or internal combustion engines.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) have established rules and guidelines for the protection of workers and facilities relating to powered industrial trucks in 29 CFR 1910.178 Powered Industrial Trucks; and NFPA 505 Fire Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks, including Type, Designation, Areas of Use, Conversions, Maintenance and Operations, which are incorporated into this plan.

Ohio State units that own or lease powered industrial trucks or who have employees who operate powered industrial trucks are responsible to implement the written program.

Supervisors should use the Forklift Supervisor Evaluation Form to assess and certify each employee's ability to safely and properly use a forklift. Copies of these forms should be kept in the appropriate departmental file.

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Download the OSU Forklift & Powered Industrial Truck Safety Program

 

Hand and Portable Power Tool Safety

It is Ohio State's policy to take precautions to eliminate hazards associated with the use of hand and portable power tools and to ensure employees are properly trained to utilize these tools in a safe manner to minimize injuries related to their use. The Hand & Portable Power Tool Safety Program prescribes the duty to maintain tools and equipment, use hand and portable power tools in a safe manner, and minimize injury and/or accidents associated with their use.

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Links

Ohio PERRP Hand Tools Safety
OSHA Hand and Power Tools
OSHA Nail Gun Safety
OSHA Machine Guarding

Hazard Communication

Hazard Communication

The purpose of the Hazard Communication Program (HazCom) is to ensure employees are aware of hazardous chemicals in the workplace and are provided information regarding the potential hazards associated with exposure to these chemicals. This program is designed to comply with the Public Employment Risk Reduction Program (PERRP) [Ohio House Bill 308 an Act] and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazard Communication Program or “Employee Right-to-Know” act. All employees are required to have Hazard Communication Training, and every department using hazardous chemicals should have a written program.

Global Harmonized Systems GHS

The Ohio State Hazard Communication Program also provides information for compliance with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). The GHS is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labeling of chemicals. It is a logical and comprehensive approach to defining health, physical and environmental hazards of chemicals, creating classification processes that use available data on chemicals for comparison with the defined hazard criteria, and communicating hazard information and protective measures on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

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Download the OSU Hazard Communication Program

Hearing Conservation

Employee exposures to noise of sufficient intensity and duration can result in hearing damage. Noise-induced hearing loss rarely results from just one exposure.  Usually it will progress unnoticed over a period of years. Initial noise-induced hearing loss occurs at higher frequencies where speech is found, making communication difficult. Excessive noise exposure is a cause of hearing loss.

OSHA sets legal limits on noise exposure in the workplace. These limits are based on a worker's time weighted average over an 8-hour day. OSHA's permissible exposure limit (PEL) for noise is 90 A-weighted decibels (dBA) for all workers for an 8-hour day. The OSHA standard uses a 5 dBA exchange rate meaning, when noise levels are increased by 5 dBA, the amount of time a person can be exposed is cut in half.

Employers are required to implement a Hearing Conservation Program when workers are exposed to a time weighted average noise level of 85 dBA or higher during an 8-hour work shift. Hearing Conservation Programs require employers to measure noise levels, provide free annual hearing exams and free hearing protection, provide training and conduct evaluations of the adequacy of the hearing protectors.

The Ohio State Hearing Conservation Program outlines responsibilities for employees exposed to excessive noise, supervisors of those employees, administrative and engineering controls for noise exposures, and all other required elements of a hearing conservation program.

The Occupational Safety group provides noise evaluations for Ohio State employees and/or departmental tasks thought to be above or near exposure limits. Noise evaluations can be requested by making a noise survey request. 

NOISE SURVEY REQUEST

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Links

OSHA Noise
OSHA Occupational Noise Exposure
Ohio BWC Hearing Conservation Program

Heat and Cold Stress

Heat and Cold Stress

EHS can provide monitoring and assist employees with developing procedures to minimize the adverse effects of heat and cold stress in workplace. Additionally, EHS can provide training to employees exposed to extreme temperatures.

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Stinging and Biting Insect Safety

Stinging or biting insects can be hazardous to Ohio State employees who predominantly work outdoors. Some of these stinging or biting insects include bees, wasps, hornets, fire ants, and spiders. Some examples of outdoor workers at risk of exposure to insects include groundskeepers, agricultural workers, construction/maintenance workers, painters, roofers, and any other workers who spend time outside. The health effects of stinging or biting insects range from mild discomfort or pain to lethal reaction for individuals who are allergic to the insect’s venom. Anaphylactic shock is the body’s severe allergic reaction to a bite or sting and requires immediate emergency care. Thousands of people are injured by insects every year, and as many as 100 people in the United States die as a result of allergic reactions.

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Links

OSHA Heat Stress Guide
OSHA Cold Stress Guide

Hot Work Permit

The purpose for the hot work permit program is to ensure that spark- and flame-producing construction and maintenance activities do not present an undue fire hazard to the people and Ohio State property. 

Hot work includes any operation producing flame, sparks or heat. Examples of hot work include but are not limited to torch cutting, welding, brazing, grinding, sawing, torch soldering, thawing frozen pipes and applying roofing.

If you have questions about hot work, need additional assistance or need a Hot Work Permit, contact Steve Davidson at 614-292-1284 x4-9459 or John Sharpe at 614-292-0619. Additionally, Hot Work Permits can be obtained through a service request. 

ALL HOT WORK PERMIT REQUESTS AND NOTIFICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED 24-HOURS BEFORE THE START OF HOT WORK ACTIVITIES, except for emergencies.

SERVICE REQUEST

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Links

OSHA Resistance Welding
OSHA Arc Welding
OSHA Oxygen-fuel Gas Welding and Cutting
OSHA Fact Sheet on Controlling Hazardous Fumes and Gases during Welding
OSHA Quicktake Hexavalent ChromiumOSHA Hexavalent Chromium
Ohio BWC Welding Safety

Indoor Air Quality Assessment

Because of the vast number and complexity of buildings at Ohio State, a wide range of working conditions exist. The quality of indoor air in buildings should allow employees to work safely at all times, but there are rare circumstances where hazards, such as elevated particulates (dust, dander, and allergens), volatile chemical vapors, vehicle emissions, mold, etc. may enter workplace air. EHS has the capability to conduct air monitoring for these and many other compounds to evaluate a building's air supply.

SERVICE REQUEST

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Links

OSU Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning
EPA Indoor Air Quality
NIOSH / CDC Indoor Air Quality
NIH Mold Facts
OSHA Ventilation

Job Hazard Analysis

Safety hazards are present in every workplace. To properly identify hazards and protect workers from them, a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) should be performed. A proper JHA involves reviewing each task performed to determine where hazards exist providing recommendations for hazard elimination/protection, identifying appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and training to inform employees of appropriate safety standards and precautions.

Administrative and/or engineering controls should be the first line of defense when protecting employees. PPE should be used when administrative and/or engineering controls are not sufficient to control exposure to the hazard(s).

Examples of recognized hazards include but are not limited to chemical exposures, radiological exposures, sharp objects, excessive noise, heavy objects, fall hazards, flying debris, overhead hazards, laser energy or other non-ionizing radiation, or any other hazard that may cause injury, illness, or impairment by inhalation, absorption, ingestion, injection or mechanical action.

Supervisors are responsible for ensuring their employees have the appropriate training and safety equipment before assigning hazardous job duties. Supervisors shall ensure the development of JHAs, but the JHA forms shall be reviewed by workers performing the hazardous job duties for feedback and suggestions. Often employees who routinely utilize equipment and/or perform specific job tasks are better able to identify certain hazards associated with the work, so it is critical that those individuals be involved in the JHA development process.

SERVICE REQUEST

View Program   |   JHA Based on Job Classification | Create a JHA
If you are unable to download the JHA creation tool, please see recommended settings here.

Links

OSHA Job Hazard Analysis

Lead Safety

It is Ohio State's policy to take precautions to eliminate potential hazards in the workplace. The purpose of the Lead Safety Program is to provide the hazards associated with lead and lead-containing materials, outline the steps to take to ensure employees who work with or around lead are not exposed to hazardous levels of lead, and to provide procedures for common lead related work duties to minimize exposure in accordance with the OSHA Lead Standard (29 CFR 1910.1025).

The primary use of lead in the United States is for automobile lead-acid storage batteries, a type of rechargeable electric battery that uses an almost pure lead alloy. Lead-formed alloys typically are found in pipes, cable covering, building material, solder, radiation shielding, and collapsible tubes. Lead also is used in ceramic glazes and as a stabilizer in plastics. Lead was used extensively as a corrosion inhibitor and pigment in paints, but concerns about its toxicity led the ban of lead in paint for residential and public buildings.

Lead enters the body primarily through inhalation and ingestion. Today, adults are exposed to lead mainly by breathing in lead-containing dust and fumes at work or from hobbies that involve lead. Lead passes through the lungs into the blood where it can harm many of the body's organ systems. While inorganic lead does not readily enter the body through the skin, it can enter the body through accidental ingestion (eating, drinking, and smoking) via contaminated hands, clothing, and surfaces.

Workers may develop a variety of ailments, such as neurological effects, gastrointestinal effects, anemia, and kidney disease.

Online Lead Awareness Safety Training is available through the EHS Online Training Program.

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Links

OSHA Toxic and Hazardous Substances
EPA Lead Safety
NIOSH/CDC Lead Safety

Legionella Exposure Control Plan

It is the policy of The Ohio State University (OSU) to take precautions to eliminate potential hazards in the workplace. The purpose of the Legionella Exposure Control Plan is to specify the standard practices to be used by facility management to prevent legionellosis associated with building water systems. Legionellosis refers to two illnesses associated with legionella bacterium. When the bacterium Legionella causes pneumonia, the disease is referred to as Legionnaires’ disease. Legionella can also cause a less severe influenza-like illness known as Pontiac Fever. Most all cases of legionellosis are the result of exposure to Legionella associated with building water systems.

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Download the OSU Legionella Exposure Control Plan

Lockout Tagout

The Ohio State LOTO Program establishes requirements for the lockout of energy-isolating devices. The intent is to ensure that equipment is de-energized and isolated from all potentially hazardous energy sources and locked out (and tagged) before employees perform service or maintenance tasks where the unexpected energizing, start-up or release of stored energy could cause injury.

Ohio State Departments with employees assigned to work on areas where LOTO is required are responsible for implementing the LOTO Program, conducting periodic evaluations of the program, ensure affected employees have been properly trained in all applicable areas of LOTO, maintain a list of authorized employees who may perform LOTO procedures, provide sufficient locks and tags for the LOTO procedures being conducted and develop equipment specific LOTO procedures for each type of equipment.

If you have questions about LOTO, contact Steve Davidson at 614-292-1284 x4-9459.

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Download the OSU Lockout/Tagout Safety Program

Mercury Spills

Mercury is the only metal that is a liquid at room temperature. It is commonly found in thermometers, barometers, manometers and sphygmomanometers. Mercury can also be present in small amounts in thermostats, batteries, paint and switches.

The release of mercury from an apparatus can result in mercury vapor contamination in the workplace. If not properly cleaned up, mercury vapor can cause adverse health effects over time. If a mercury release has occurred in the workplace, complete the following steps. 1) Isolate the area of the spill and do not allow foot traffic through the area; 2) Contact Environmental Health & Safety 614-292-1284 immediately and do not attempt to clean up the spill individually. EHS has the capability to conduct mercury vapor monitoring, clean up released elemental mercury and decontaminate affected areas using equipment specifically designed for mercury releases.

SERVICE REQUEST

View Related Documents

Links

CDC Mercury
OSHA Mercury
EPA Mercury Releases and Spills

Nanoparticle

Nanotechnology is a practice which involves using nanoscale structures in order to create new materials and products. This procedure is advantageous in distinct medical and scientific fields; however, it could also be hazardous to individuals working with nanoparticles. Studies have shown nanoparticles have the ability to travel into the body through distinct routes of exposure, specifically inhalation, and cause adverse health effects.

The Ohio State University (OSU) Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) has created a Nanoparticle Safety Program to minimize the risk associated with the hazards known when handling nanoparticles.

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Standard Operating Procedure for Nanoparticle Safety
*If you are unable to download this document, please see recommended settings here.

Links

OSHA Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals
OSHA Working Safely with Nanomaterials
OSHA Health Effects and Workplace Assessments and Controls
OSHA Introduction to Nanomaterials
Nanoparticle Tool Kit

OSHA Coordinator Program

To assist OSU colleges/departments in complying with Ohio Public Employment Risk Reduction Program (PERRP) requirements (PERRP has adopted all OSHA standards and regulations), EHS has implemented an OSHA Coordinator Program. Each OSU college/department is responsible for assigning OSHA Coordinator responsibilities within the unit.

OSHA Coordinators will ensure PERRP compliance and act as a liaison between the administrative unit and EHS. The OSU Safety Management Guidebook is a tool that can be used by OSHA Coordinators to identify required safety and training programs for the unit. EHS is available to help OSHA Coordinators with program area development and training needs.

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Links

Ohio Public Employment Risk Reduction Program

Personal Protective Equipment

Safety hazards are present in every workplace. To properly identify hazards and protect workers from them, a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) should be performed. A proper JHA involves reviewing each task performed to determine where hazards exist; providing recommendations for hazard elimination/protection; and identifying appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and training to inform employees of appropriate safety standards and precautions.

Administrative and/or engineering controls should be the first line of defense when protecting employees. PPE should be used when administrative and/or engineering controls are not sufficient to control exposure to the hazard(s).

Examples of recognized hazards include, but are not limited to, chemical exposures; radiological exposures; sharp objects; excessive noise; heavy objects; fall hazards; flying debris; overhead hazards; laser energy or other non-ionizing radiation; or any other hazard which may cause injury; illness; or impairment by inhalation, absorption, ingestion, injection or mechanical action.

The following PPE Selection Guides will help in the proper selection and use of PPE:
 

Body ProtectionEye Protection
Fall ProtectionFoot Protection
Hand ProtectionHead Protection
Hearing ProtectionRespiratory Protection


All employees shall use the appropriate PPE for their assigned job duties. For assistance in identifying PPE required, view a job classification below:

Administrative ProfessionalAir Quality Technician
Animal Care TechnicianAthletic Aide
Athletic TrainerBuilding Maintenance Worker
CarpenterConstruction Technician
CustodianDock Worker
ElectricianEngineer
Facility ManagerFaculty Member
GroundskeeperHuman Resources
Inventory ClerkLaboratory Teaching Assistant
Laboratory WorkerLocksmith
MasonMechanic
Metal WorkerNurse
Office WorkerPainter
PhysicianPlumber
Police Officer/First ResponderProject Manager
ResearcherRoofer
Steam Plant/Tunnel WorkerWelder
Zone Leader 

Supervisors are responsible for developing specific Job Hazard Analyses for their employees. EHS can provide assistance developing specific Job Hazard Analyses, upon request, to ensure a safe workplace is provided.

Links

CDC Personal Protective Equipment Guidelines
OSHA Personal Protective Equipment Standard
OSHA Job Hazard Analysis

Pesticide Safety

OSU employees who apply pesticides as part of their job are required to either, obtain a Commercial Applicator License through appropriate training and testing, or work under the supervision of a Licensed Applicator as a Trained Service Person.

Commercial Applicator License Training is available, for a fee, through the Ohio Pesticide Safety Education Program which is part of the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Online Lessons are also available to help prepare for the certification training and exam.

Trained Service Person Training can be obtained by reading the Trained Service Person Manual (OSU Bulletin 863) or by receiving equivalent training from his/her supervisor.

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Links

Ohio Pesticide Safety Education Program
 

Respiratory Protection

The Ohio State University’s Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), in compliance with state laws, adopted from Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules found at 29 CFR 1910.134, has developed a General Respiratory Protection Program. This program covers all faculty and staff employed by The Ohio State University, who are required to wear respiratory protection.

EHS provides respiratory fit tests for OSU employees required to use respiratory protection. Respiratory fit tests can be scheduled by using the OSU EHS Respirator Fit Test Scheduler (calendar) (follow the instructions after clicking the link) or can be requested by using the Service Request Form (select Occupational Health and Safety from the Service Area drop-down menu and Respiratory Fit Test from the Service drop-down menu).

If you don't know which type of respirator to use, answer the questions in the Respirator Selection Guide.

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Training Sheets
Full Face Respirator Training Sheet
Half Face Respirator Training Sheet
N-95 (Dust Mask) Respirator Training Sheet
PAPR (Powered Air Purifying Respirator) Training Sheet
*If you are unable to download the training sheets, please see recommended settings here.

Links

Schedule a Respirator Fit Test with OSU EHS
OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard
OSHA Respiratory Protection eTool
Ohio BWC Respiratory Protection

Shop Safety

Description

The EHS Shop Safety Program provides inspections and recommendations to shops for the hazards present. EHS will work with shop personnel to help ensure appropriate Safety programs and training are in place to protect workers from hazards they could encounter as part of their work assignments.

Shops can include machine shops, wood shops and maintenance shops. Each type of shop presents specific safety hazards, which if not properly identified and addressed, can lead to injury. EHS provides inspections and recommendations to shops for the hazards present. EHS will work with shop personnel to help ensure appropriate Safety programs and training are in place to protect workers from hazards they could encounter as part of their work assignments.

SERVICE REQUEST

View Program   |   View Related Documents

Links

OSHA PPE Topic Page
OSHA Hazard Communication Page

Silica Dust Safety

It is the policy of The Ohio State University (OSU) to take precautions to eliminate potential hazards in the workplace. The purpose of this Silica Dust Safety Program is to provide the hazards associated with silica dust and outline the steps to take to ensure employees who work with, or around silica are not exposed to hazardous levels of silica dust; and to provide procedures for common silica related work duties to minimize exposure in accordance with the OSHA Air Contaminants standard (29 CFR 1910.1000).

Crystalline silica is a basic component of soil, sand, granite and many other minerals. Quartz is the most common form of crystalline silica. All materials containing silica can result in the presence of respirable silica particles when chipping, cutting, drilling or grinding takes place. Silica exposure occurs through inhalation of silica containing particles and occurs through many construction and general industry methods. The most severe exposures generally occur during abrasive blasting with sand to remove paint and rust from bridges, tanks, concrete structures and other surfaces. Other activities that may result in sever silica exposure include jack hammering, rock/well drilling, concrete mixing, concrete drilling, brick and concrete cutting/sawing, tuck pointing and tunneling operations. Exposure to excessive silica dust over long periods of time can result in silicosis.

This Silica Dust Safety Program applies to OSU employees who are expected to be exposed to silica dust through the methods outlined above; or through other means, which are determined by EHS or their supervisor.

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Download the OSU Silica Dust Safety Program

 

Training Guides

Safety hazards are present in almost every workplace. Based on these hazards and federal, state and local rules and regulations; special safety training may be required or suggested. Because of the diverse work environments and job classifications at The Ohio State University, the department of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) developed the following Training Guides to assist with determining the appropriate safety training based on job classification. Click on the job classification that most closely aligns:

Administrative ProfessionalAir Quality Technician
Animal Care TechnicianAthletic Aide
Athletic TrainerBuilding Maintenance Worker
CarpenterConstruction Technician
CustodianDock Worker
ElectricianEngineer
Facility ManagerFaculty Member
GroundskeeperHazardous Waste Specialist
Human ResourcesInventory Clerk
Kitchen/Cafeteria WorkerLaboratory Teaching Assistant
Laboratory WorkerLocksmith
MasonMechanic
Metal WorkerNurse
Office WorkerPainter
PhysicianPlumber
Police OfficerProject Manager
ResearcherRoofer
Steam Plant/Tunnel WorkerWelder
Zone Leader 

Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that the appropriate safety training is provided on specific hazards in the workplace.

Resources

Create a JHA Tool
New Employee Safety Training Checklist
Training Matrix
OSHA Job Hazard Analysis Link

Ventilation Assessment

Ventilation within laboratories, classrooms and offices is essential for providing a safe and comfortable workplace. EHS can provide ventilation evaluations to determine if Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems are working properly and efficiently. Laboratory chemical fume hoods, biosafety cabinets and laminar flow benches can be inspected to ensure worker safety. Classroom and office HVAC systems can be evaluated to ensure adequate circulation throughout buildings.

SERVICE REQUEST

Links

OSHA Ventilation

Working Alone Safety

Some job functions at The Ohio State University will be performed by lone workers. EHS has created a Working Alone Safety Program that applies to OSU employees whose job duties require them to work alone in any facets of their job(s).

Working alone describes situations during the course of employment when an employee is the only worker at the workplace and is:

  • Not directly supervised by the employer
  • Working at a site where assistance is not readily available
  • In an area where direct contact with a co-worker or supervisor is not available
  • In a dangerous area (either due to work processes or likelihood of being robbed)
  • Traveling away from the base office to meet clients

View Program

Download the OSU Working Alone Safety Program